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To mark Library Card Sign-up Month in September, we asked Kansas City Public Library staffers to share the favorite ways they use their cards.

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Prior to this year's Plaza Art Fair, explore the life and works of some prominent 20th and 21st century artists via these DVDs available through your local Kansas City Public Library.

Andy Warhol
A portrait of the artist as personality; his impact on the world of art has been undeniable.

Ansel Adams movie cover

Ansel Adams
Explore the life and work of this prominent photographer/environmentalist through this portrait by Ric Burns.

Chuck Close: A Portrait in Progress
Traces Close's painterly evolution from his first series of black-and-white heads. Follows him into the contemporary art community of New York where he encounters other artists.

Francis Bacon
Explore the work of this important British artist of the 20th century.

There are infinitely worse ways to spend a Saturday night in Kansas City, and not many better ones, than to spend it with Robert Day and the Kansas City Symphony at The Writers Place.

On September 25, 2008 at the Central Library, Jennet Conant discussed her new book, titled The Irregulars: Roald Dahl and the British Spy Ring in Wartime Washington. Explore Conant’s earlier books surrounding American involvement in World War II, learn more about author and spy Roald Dahl through his own memoirs, or pick up a title about British intelligence during wartime.

Books by Jennet Conant | About Roald Dahl | British Intelligence during World War II

Books by Jennet Conant

The Irregulars: Roald Dahl and the British Spy Ring in Wartime Washington
By Jennet Conant
Prior to the U.S. entering World War II, a small coterie of British spies in Washington, D.C., was formed. Richly detailed and carefully researched, Conant creates a fascinating, lively account of deceit, double dealing, and moral ambiguity – all in the name of victory.

It was a hard weekend in the book world. Two of its most respected and revered authors turned the last page.

A couple of Sundays ago the New York Times Book Review devoted their front page to Traffic by Tom Vanderbilt. This scholarly and intriguing work of nonfiction explores the history of traffic patterns and driver culture, particularly in America. It was a glowing review of a book that deserves to be read by anyone holding a drivers’ license.

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