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Thursday, May 21, 2020

Beginning Tuesday, May 19, 2020, the Library initiates a phased-in reintroduction of some services and operations.  We begin with a new Pop In/Pick Up contact-free holds service, allowing patrons to pick up holds at five locations during designated hours, expanding to others in the coming weeks. But anxious as we are – and know that you are, too – we will remain cautious and deliberate. Read more about what our next steps are.

Follow updates at kclibrary.org/coronavirus. You can also find additional information at kclibrary.org/covid19resources.
 

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Last modified: 
Tuesday, January 27, 2009

Celebrate the bicentennial of the birth of America’s 16th president, Abraham Lincoln, with these books examining his life and legacy, from his leadership skills to his rhetoric to his personal relationships.

General biographies | Leadership | Civil War | Race | Politics | Assassination | Writings | Photos & documents |
Personal life | In popular culture

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Monday, March 16, 2009

Do you like spooky stories?

Neil Gaiman is one of the spookiest writers around, although he also writes funny stories for kids and grown-ups.

I just finished The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman.The main character is a boy who escapes, as a toddler, from the evil man Jack who kills his family. Nobody Owens is adopted by ghosts in the graveyard. He grows up among the tombstones and crypts. "Bod" has special cemetary privileges, such seeing in the dark. He learns magical things, such as willing himself to be almost invisible. One of his tutors is a werewolf. Bod learns how to fight ghouls and cope with the strange creature called the Sleer. When he tries to deal with flesh-and-blood bullies at a nearby school, however, he discovers that good intentions can lead to unexpected problems.

But the man Jack is on his trail--one day, Bod must confront the man who stalks him still.

What are your favorite spooky tales?

Yours with snorts,

S. Will Burr signature

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Wednesday, January 21, 2009

This reading list includes books that discuss our global economy from different perspectives.

By Amar Bhidé | Global economy

By Amar Bhidé

The Origin and Evolution of New Businesses
By Amar V. Bhidé
In a field dominated by anecdote and folklore, this study integrates more than ten years of intensive research and modern theories of business and economics. The result is a comprehensive framework for understanding entrepreneurship that provides new and penetrating insights. Examining hundreds of successful ventures, the author finds that the typical business has humble, improvised origins. Well-planned start-ups, backed by substantial venture capital, are exceptional. This book is essential for anyone who wants to start a business, for the entrepreneur or executive who wants to grow a company, and for the scholar who wants to understand this crucial economic activity.

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Tuesday, January 20, 2009

Read up on women in art and comics in these books about prominent African American women artists and women cartoonists or check out one of their memoirs written in graphic novel form.

African American women artists | Women cartoonists
Graphic memoirs by women

African American women artists

Jackie Ormes: The First African American Woman Cartoonist
By Nancy Goldstein
Jackie Ormes chronicles the life of this multiply talented, fascinating woman who became a successful commercial artist and cartoonist. Ormes's cartoon characters (including Torchy Brown, Candy, and Patty-Jo 'n' Ginger) delighted readers of newspapers such as the Pittsburgh Courier and Chicago Defender, and spawned other products, including fashionable paper dolls in the Sunday papers and a black doll with her own extensive and stylish wardrobe.

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Tuesday, January 20, 2009

“Once upon a midnight dreary…” So begins “The Raven,” one of the spookiest poems by a master of the macabre and mysteries – Edgar Allan Poe. Born on January 19, 1809, this influential 19th century author of works such as the “The Tell Tale Heart” and “The Fall of the House of Usher” celebrates his 200th birthday this week.

The U.S. Postal Service honored Poe on this occasion with a commemorative stamp. Not quite so grandly, I’ve decided to read a book for my celebration of his birthday.

The library has hundreds of books written by or about Edgar Allan Poe, but I’m going to pick up a novel inspired by his short, dramatic life. Poe left a long legacy and dozens of books depict Poe as a fictionalized character. These recent mysteries look particularly entertaining.

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