Paired Power: Marshall and Eisenhower

David W. Mills
Military historian David W. Mills of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College examines the long and fruitful association of Dwight Eisenhower and U.S. Army chief of staff (and future secretary of state) John Marshall, who first recognized Ike’s talent and promoted him.
Wednesday, April 17, 2019
Reception: 
6 pm
Program: 
6:30 pm

Of all the Americans he knew, Dwight Eisenhower wrote in 1954, “George Marshall possessed more of the qualities of greatness than has any other.”

Unlike Ike, Marshall never commanded in battle. But he was a skilled administrator and strategist whose strengths as the U.S. Army’s chief of staff included an ability to identify and promote officers—including Eisenhower—with talent. Marshall went on to win a Nobel Peace Prize for his postwar work as a diplomat and secretary of state. Eisenhower, of course, ascended to the White House.

Military historian David W. Mills of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College examines their long and fruitful association.