Book Reviews

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The survivors of the Lawrence Massacre are featured in a new book.

Of William Quantrill, the Reverend H.D. Fisher wrote: “In him were represented courage and cowardice; successful leadership, intrigue, cunning, desperation, revenge and hate, all to a marked degree.” Fisher would have known, too – Quantrill nearly killed him.

Fisher was one of the survivors of the 1863 guerrilla raid on Lawrence, Kansas, that left 180 dead and much of the town burned to the ground. A new book by a local scholar examines how the survivors of the Lawrence Massacre rebuilt their town and their lives.

Lawrence historian Katie Armitage comes to the Central Library on Sunday, August 29, at 2 p.m. to discuss her new book, Lawrence Survivors of Quantrill’s Raid. The event is free and open to the public; RSVP here to reserve a seat.

Lies My Teacher Told Me - Loewen

Have you ever wondered whether history books were telling the truth? James W. Loewen's Lies My Teacher Told Me sheds some new light on American history – and how high school textbooks are getting it wrong. Loewen speaks on misconceptions about slavery and the Underground Railroad on Thursday, July 29, at 6:30 p.m. at the Central Library.

Professor Loewen, a race relations expert and author of five books, opens Lies my Teacher Told Me with a simple assertion: "High school students hate history." From the students' perspective, he argues, history is both too complicated and too simple. Loewen finds that high school textbooks offer a dizzying array of information, with books averaging 4.5 pounds and 888 pages. At the same time, the stories presented in textbooks all feature neat, clean facts imparted with bland patriotism. This method, Loewen argues, reduces history to "a gray emotional landscape of pious duty" rather than a dramatic landscape of interrelated stories and events.

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