Poster

"The Delinquents"

"The Delinquents", a 1957 American dramatic cinematic film was written and produced by Robert Altman. The plot of this film follows two romantically involved teens, Scotty White and Janice Wilson through Kansas City amidst an era of hot rod gangs and youthful delinquency in the 1950's. The poster is noted for its high utilization of color saturation. Vibrant red is laid out in a triangular shape on the upper left corner of the poster. The lower right corner contains a concentrated yellow and each area is bordered by a solid blue.

Architectural Drawing of the New York Public Library

Located in New York City, Carrère and Hastings was one of the most significant Beaux-Arts Architecture firms in the United States. The architectural team ran a successful practice during the 1880s -1890s. The firm focused on designs for commercial buildings and elaborate homes. They gained notoriety in 1897 when the firm won the design competition for the New York Public Library. The print reproduction shown here is a proposal draft of the Fifth Avenue elevation of the New York Public Library.

Bellagio Promenade

Howard Behrens was born in Chicago, Illinois in 1933. Behrens grew up near Washington D.C. , and started drawing at the age of seventeen after being bed ridden from a sledding accident. Behrens earned a Master's degree in painting and sculpture from the University of Maryland. He traveled extensively, proliferating his talent and developing new techniques. Behrens was renowned as a palette knife artist, through his rich, distinctive and textured style.

Blue & White Quiltscape

Rebecca Barker is a painter from Ohio whose "childhood appreciation for quilts and country life inspires the subjects she paints today" (-www.barkerquiltscapes.com). Each quiltscape takes a quilt pattern and pairs its color palette with an accompanying landscape. Here, a red, white, and blue starburst patterned quilt hangs on a laundry line outside. Beyond it are rows of a crop and farm on the horizon that is framed by the clothespins holding the quilt in place.

Chicago Great Western Railway Route Map, "Maple Leaf Route"

"The Maple Leaf Route" map is a print which features the rail exchange between Minneapolis, Kansas City, and Chicago with all the included stops between each. The bold print lines on the map imitate the veins of a maple leaf, exhibiting the imagery that inspired the route's name. The bottom of the print mentions W. H. Long as the City Passenger and Ticket Agent of the Des Moines City Office and T. N. Hooper as the Division Freight Agent.

Garroby Hill

This is an exhibition poster that includes an image of David Hockney's oil painting "Garrowby Hill" (1998). The image here depicts an expanse of the Yorkshire countryside in bright swatches of color strung together with a winding road that simultaneously reaches toward the viewer and disappears into the distance. The painting was acquired by the Boston Museum of Fine Arts the same year it was created.

Gene Hackman in "Prime Cut"

In the 1972 film "Prime Cut", Nick Devlin (Lee Marvin), a Chicago Irish Mob enforcer is sent to Kansas City to collect a debt from Mary Ann (Gene Hackman), who heads a meatpacking and clandestine female slavery operation outside of the city. Throughout the movie, congruence between the two industries abound as Devlin and Mary Ann scheme to settle their dispute. The entire plot thrives off of the agricultural location and reality of each industry's existence in the area.

Harper's Weekly 1890 Cover

This is an enlarged poster of a drawing of a downtown Kansas City block by Charles Graham. Beneath the image reads "NINTH STREET, KANSAS CITY, LOOKING WEST FROM WALNUT STREET-Drawn by Charles Graham- [SEE PAGE 451]." One gets a sense of what the artist may have seen while looking in this direction: a bustling city street alive with streetcars, patrons, and businesses. The buildings that extend the edge of the frame emphasize their verticality and provide a view contemplating the health and progression of the city.

Heat up, Cool Down: Kansas City Jazz

The slogan "Heat Up, Cool Down" with the quite literal image of a gushing fire hydrant ablaze provides an exciting visual representation of the improvisational characteristic common to the jazz musical genre. According to this poster, 1983 was a "hot" year for the Kansas City Jazz Festival featuring artists Count Basie, Ella Fitzgerald, George Benson, and Oscar Peterson. Events started August 27th and concluded September 4th with concerts, birthday parties, and luncheons every day.

Hollywood

Taken from the gallery label of the original work on display at the Nelson-Atkins: "Hollywood resulted from Thomas Hart Benton's Life magazine-sponsored excursion to Tinseltown in the summer of 1937. The composition unites various aspects of movie-making, revealing Benton's fascination with what he called "the machinery of the industry" responsible for cinematic effects.

Il Vendicatore Di Kansas City (1)

Warner Bros. 1964's release of the Italian production film "Il Vendicatore Di Kansas City". The plot of this film centers around the gunfighter Frank Dalton (Paul Piaget) and the sheriff (Fernando Casanova) seek the real culprit of a murder pinned on Dalton's sister. The predominant feature, in this full color illustration, is that of two gunslingers amidst a gunfight. The protagonist, Sheriff Paul, is depicted in the upper right, firing on the antagonist, purportedly the character Frank Dalton in the lower left of the illustration.

Il Vendicatore Di Kansas City (2)

The plot of "Il Vendicatore Di Kansas City", a Warner Bros. release of the Italian production film directed by Agustín Navarro, centers around the gunfighter Frank Dalton (Paul Piaget) and the sheriff (Fernando Casanova) as they seek the real culprit of a murder pinned on Dalton's sister. This poster features the title of the film in a striking film noir font over a black and white silhouette of the sheriff. To the right a watercolored film still of Dalton fiercely interrogating a woman who cowers away from him.

Il Vendicatore Di Kansas City (3)

Warner Bros. 1964's release of the Italian production film "Il Vendicatore Di Kansas City". The plot of this film centers around the gunfighter Frank Dalton, portrayed by Paul Piaget, and the sheriff, portrayed by Fernando Casanova, seek the real culprit of a murder pinned on Dalton's sister. The predominant feature, in this full color depiction, details Fernando Casanova, disarming Paul Piaget. Casanova appears casting Piaget's gun away, as Piaget is raising his arms in surrender.

Joan Davis in "Kansas City Kitty"

Promotional poster of Columbia’s 1944 film "Kansas City Kitty". The plot of this film centers around Polly Jasper (Joan Davis) a charming wisecracking piano teacher. Polly gets involved with some shady music publishers named Latham & Clark. The publishers sell their business to Polly and her friend Eileen Hasbrook (Jane Frazee). One hour before the sale, the company was sued for the legitimacy of the song “Kansas City Kitty”. Polly happens to be obsessed with her music loving dentist Dr. Henry Talbot (Erik Rolph) who is not quite as romantically inclined.

John Payne in "Kansas City Confidential"

Kansas City Confidential tells the tale of Timothy Foster, a corrupt ex-policeman. In blackmailing three criminals to complete a robbery, he incidentally implicates a man unrelated to his scheme who gets mistaken for Foster by the authorities. The man, Joe Rolfe, eventually gets the charges against him dropped but goes to track down Foster and the original criminals in a fit of anger. This poster captures a film still of Rolfe getting stopped by the police in the same van implicated in the crime. He sticks his head out of the van window with an incredulous look on his face.

Kansas City (1)

This film, set in 1930s Kansas City, features Blondie (Jennifer Jason Leigh), the wife of a petty thief named Johnny who gets abducted by a major KC mobster, Seldom Seen (Harry Belafonte). In order to save her husband, Blondie abducts the wife of a prominent politician who is connected to the mob as leverage to free him. Conditions complicate as Blondie and the politician's wife, Carolyn Stilton (Miranda Richardson), befriend each other along the way.

Kansas City (2)

This film, set in 1930s Kansas City, features Blondie (Jennifer Jason Leigh), the wife of a petty thief named Johnny who gets abducted by a major KC mobster, Seldom Seen (Harry Belafonte). In order to save her husband, Blondie abducts the wife of a prominent politician who is connected to the mob as leverage to free him. Conditions complicate as Blondie and the politician's wife, Carolyn Stilton (Miranda Richardson), befriend each other along the way.

Kansas City Art Deco Society

The Kansas City Art Deco Society was founded by Bill McDevitt in 1996. McDevitt's goal was to "preserve the bold geometric patterns and streamlined designs that comprised the area's signature architecture in the years between the World Wars" (-Kansas City Business Journal). This poster serves as a graphic token of those designs. A black san serif font overlays a gold border. At the center, a female figure stands in a presentation stance in front of a highly stylized Art Deco structure. This central image is most likely a still from a film.

Kansas City Bomber (i)

This poster features a larger-than-life Raquel Welch in her role as K.C. Carr in the 1972 film "Kansas City Bomber". This film was a drama about the merciless social dynamics behind the scenes in the sport of Roller Derby. Raquel Welch, or K.C. Carr, plays a single mother and derby star who leaves her team in Kansas City to play for the Portland Loggers in Oregon. Work, romance, and deceit plague her experience with her new team until K.C. Carr realizes her fierce independence is the key to her success on and off the track.

Kansas City Bomber (ii)

This poster features a larger-than-life Raquel Welch in her role as K.C. Carr in the 1972 film "Kansas City Bomber". This film was a drama about the merciless social dynamics behind the scenes in the sport of Roller Derby. Raquel Welch, or K.C. Carr, plays a single mother and derby star who leaves her team in Kansas City to play for the Portland Loggers in Oregon. Work, romance, and deceit plague her experience with her new team until K.C. Carr realizes her fierce independence is the key to her success on and off the track.

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